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Dissolution of a Corporation Law 

Dissolution of a Corporation Law 

Corporation Law 

Dissolution of a corporation is a multi-step and complex process which requires following regulations of the Internal Revenue Service and the laws of the state where the company was incorporated. Corporation dissolution is usually voluntary, but in some cases it may also be state ordered.  

This occurs generally when a corporate fails to file necessary information statements with the state of incorporation or fails to pay or file corporate taxes. The dissolution process remains the same regardless of the decision. 

Attorneys at SBEMP (Slovak, Baron, Empey, Murphy & Pinkney) law firm provides professional legal advice and services to clients in Palm Springs, Palm Desert, Rancho Mirage, Inland Empire, Orange County, Coachella Valley, Costa Mesa, San Diego, New Jersey, New York, and surrounding communities. 

Articles of Dissolution 

All state laws require articles of dissolution to be filed to dissolve a corporation officially. Requirements tend to vary on whether the entity was public or private. However, most corporations are required to provide at least the filing date, the name of the corporation, and the date from which the dissolution comes into effect.  

Corporations also need to provide the dissolution decision and all information regarding unpaid taxes and pending legal actions. In some states, a corporation is required to provide information regarding assets, liabilities, and the debtors list.  

Permission to Dissolve 

The decision to dissolve can be taken through a board meeting in privately help corporations. However, publicly held corporations need to get shareholder approval to commence the dissolution process. The process would typically involve informing all shareholders about the board’s intent to dissolve.  

They would need to hold a shareholders’ meeting to allow shareholders to vote after discussing the dissolution proposal at length. The only way public corporations can start the ball rolling is if they have a majority of shareholders voting in favor of dissolution.  

Notice of Intent 

Public corporations are required to file a notice of intent in many states after getting the shareholders’ approval. Typically, the corporation name, date of adoption for the dissolution proposal, and a statement confirming that the decision has majority shareholder vote are legally required to be included in the notice of intent.  

Tax Regulations 

All corporations are legally required by the IRS to file Corporate Dissolution or Liquidation (IRS Form 966) within 30 days of filing the article of dissolution. Public corporations are required to return shareholder investments and provide a 1099-DIV to all shareholders receiving $600 or more.  

Registration Cancellations 

Corporations that are licensed to carry out business in multiple states are required to get in touch with individual corporations division in those states and acquire a certificate of termination or an application of withdrawal.  

This document is necessary to officially terminate all rights of the corporation to conduct business within the said state. It also relieves the entity of all future fee requirements and reporting. Failure to comply with this final step could mean that the corporation remains liable for state taxes and annual reporting fees even when the business does not exist officially. 

Lawyers at the SBEMP law firm serve clients from Palm Springs, Palm Desert, Rancho Mirage, Inland Empire, Orange County, Coachella Valley, Costa Mesa, San Diego, New Jersey, New York, and nearby locations for a range of legal practice areas. 

Contact SBEMP Law Firm if You Have a Legal Question

For more information or to request a consultation please contact the law offices of SBEMP (Slovak, Baron, Empey, Murphy & Pinkney) by clicking here. 

SBEMP LLP is a full service law firm with attorney offices in Palm Springs (Palm Desert, Inland Empire, Rancho Mirage), CA; Indian Wells, CA; Costa Mesa (Orange County), CA; San Diego, CA; New Jersey, NJ; and New York, NY.

DISCLAIMER: This blog post does not constitute legal advice, and no attorney-client relationship is formed by reading it. This blog post may be considered ATTORNEY ADVERTISING in some states. Prior results do not guarantee a similar outcome. Additional facts or future developments may affect subjects contained within this blog post. Before acting or relying upon any information within this newsletter, seek the advice of an attorney.

Posted in Law

SBEMP Wins CEQA Case Against In-N-Out and Rancho Mirage

SBEMP is proud to announce that Bruce T. Bauer has won attorneys’ fees on behalf of his client, Save Rancho Mirage, in a California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) case filed against In-N-Out Burgers Restaurant and the City of Rancho Mirage. The case began in October 2019 when Save Rancho Mirage took action against the City and In-N-Out, claiming that both had ignored residents’ concerns about placing a popular fast-food restaurant in the Las Palmas Shopping Center.

Rancho Mirage residents raised concerns to the City Council early on in the development process, yet project plans were approved despite their urgent requests to protect the proposed site. According to Save Rancho Mirage, a drive-through in this particular area would potentially increase traffic and crime rates, and negatively impact air-quality. Ultimately, in late January 2020, In-N-Out agreed to conduct an Environmental Impact Report (EIR) in the CEQA case and announced, through the City, that it had terminated the project and would proceed with the EIR.

On June 29, 2020, Save Rancho Mirage was awarded attorney fees since its actions were the catalyst for the In-N-Out decision. Save Rancho Mirage was awarded $64,571.35 in attorney fees. Although In-N-Out rescinded its development plans with the City in January 2019, SBEMP attorney Bruce Bauer pursued further action by filing for reimbursement of attorney fees. The Court accepted his request, agreeing that In-N-Out’s decision was brought about by Save Rancho Mirage’s filed complaint.

The suit against the City of Rancho Mirage and In-N-Out was meant to protect the residents of the City and the members of Save Rancho Mirage. Bruce T. Bauer handles all aspects of litigation, including appeals, and has numerous published decisions in state and federal courts. To learn more about his work or SBEMP’s Litigation Department, please visit our website here .


Litigation Department

With locations in Palm Springs, CA, Princeton, NJ, and Manhattan, NY, SBEMP’S Litigation practice group offers a wide range of specialized litigation services for private sector companies, public agencies and individuals. Our litigators represent clients in an array of civil disputes, including: intellectual property, personal injury, complex business and real estate, trusts and estate, construction defect, owner, contractor/sub-contractor disputes, eminent domain and condemnation, homeowners’ association and hospitality, partnership disputes, tribal, healthcare, first amendment, and defamation.

DISCLAIMER: This newsletter does not constitute legal advice, and no attorney-client relationship is formed by reading it. This newsletter may be considered ATTORNEY ADVERTISING in some states. Prior results do not guarantee a similar outcome. Additional facts or future developments may affect subjects contained within this newsletter. Before acting or relying upon any information within this newsletter, seek the advice of an attorney.

State Orders Closure of Indoor Dining and Other Indoor Activities – Palm Springs Chamber of Commerce

Notice from Palm Springs Chamber of Commerce:

State Orders Closure of Indoor Dining and Other Indoor Activities in Riverside County

On July 1, Governor Newsom ordered the closure of indoor dining and activities in 19 counties, including Riverside County. Restaurants and other indoor attractions identified by the state must cease indoor operations immediately for at least 3 weeks until permitted to resume by the State and County. Businesses ordered to cease indoor operations include:

  • Indoor Dine-in restaurants – Outdoor dining service and take out and delivery are allowed
  • Indoor Wineries and Tasting Rooms
  • Indoor Movie Theaters
  • Indoor Family Entertainment
  • Indoor Zoos and Museums
  • Indoor Cardrooms

These are not effective immediately. We anticipate they may go into effect late tomorrow or Friday.

More details are available at covid19.ca.gov.

Click here to read The Desert Sun Article

Press Conference Video

Riverside County Nonprofit Assistance Fund

The Riverside County Nonprofit Assistance Fund is a collaborative effort to provide financial support to nonprofit organizations significantly impacted by COVID. In response to the pressure COVID has placed on our nonprofits, the Riverside County Board of Supervisors approved $5 million in CARES funding to establish the Riverside County Nonprofit Assistance Fund. Operating grants will be awarded to organizations to assist with their operating expenses and costs associated with loss of revenue due to the outbreak.

The Inland Empire Community Foundation (IECF) was awarded the funds to administer, in partnership with the Riverside County Homeless Solutions and Workforce Department and the Inland Empire Funder’s Alliance.

Grants range from $2,500 – $10,000

Opening Date: July 1, 2020

Closing Date: July 31, 2020

  • Nonprofit, public benefit organizations with evidence of tax-exempt status under Section 501(c) (3) of the Internal Revenue Code and not classified as a private foundation. Fiscal sponsors are welcome.
  • 501(c) (6) organizations such as Business leagues, Chambers of Commerce, Real estate boards, or Boards of trade are also eligible to apply
  • Nonprofits that have less than 50 employees
  • Nonprofits that have received less than $100,000 in assistance from the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) or the SBA Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL)
  • Nonprofits with budgets of less than $750,000
  • Nonprofits headquartered in Riverside County or who have an office in Riverside County

Need more info? Download the Portal Guide

Download Grant Guidelines

Apply for the Riverside County Nonprofit Assistance Fund

Return to Application in Progress

Download the required Safe Reopening Plan Form

For help with applying, register for our online information sessions:

July 2, 4:00pmJuly 9, 12:00pm or July 16, 5:00pm.

If you cannot attend, all sessions will be recorded and uploaded on the website.

Contact Riverside County:

Organizations are encouraged to contact IECF staff at any time should they have questions about their application. Because IECF offices are currently closed, the best way to reach staff with general questions and inquiries about the Fund is through rivconpaf@iegives.org.

Trusts, Estates & Probate

Medicaid Benefits during COVID-19

All states that wish to maintain a 6.2 Federal Medicaid Assistance Percentage (FMAP) must not terminate Medicaid benefits during the COVID-19 Pandemic, unless the enrollee volunteers. Under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (Pub. L. 116-127), individuals enrolled in Medicaid on March 18, 2020 are exempt from termination.
This means that coverage for elderly Medicaid recipients must continue until the end of the last month of COVID-19, as declared by the Secretary of Health and Human Services. This protects individuals from losing Medicaid benefits during the pandemic, however it raises concern for their eligibility to continue in their Medicaid program once the Coronavirus Pandemic is over. Eligibility may be subject to more scrutiny than before due to a state’s budgetary pressures and pre-COVID statutes, rules, and regulations. Pending changes and transfer penalty periods may begin once the pandemic is over. Elder law attorneys should monitor their Medicaid agencies and keep clients informed of potential changes.

To read more about the Families First Coronavirus Response Act, click here.


May Review

National Elder Law Month


CASE ALERTS

Arace v. Medico Investments LLC

Cite as E071194
Filed March 24, 2020, Certified for Publication May 11, 2020, Fourth District, Div. Two

If there is proof of financial elder abuse, attorney’s fees must be awarded regardless of whether damages are awarded.

Plaintiff and Respondent, Melanie Arace, initiated action for elder abuse against Medico Investments, LLC in the interest of great-aunt, Grace R. Miller. Plaintiff alleged that Medico, or its employee, Elizabeth Colon (Colon), engaged in multiple acts of elder abuse of Miller. The jury ruled in favor of plaintiff, who was awarded damages, attorney fees, and costs. Upon Medico’s appeal, the court of appeal affirmed. The court of appeal held that once Medico was found liable for financial elder abuse, an attorney fee award was mandatory regardless of other factors.

Click here to read full court opinion.

Robertson v. Saadat et al.

Cite as B292448
Filed May 1, 2020, Second District, Div. One.

Posthumous use of stored gametic material is entirely dependent on available evidence of the decedent’s intent.

After the death of her husband, Aaron Robertson, Plaintiff, Sarah Robertson, attempted to conceive a child with his stored sperm which had been extracted while he was in a coma. When the reproductive fertility center could not find her husband’s gametic material, she filed suit. After the trial court ruled that Robertson was not legally entitled to use her deceased husband’s sperm, she appealed. The court of appeal affirmed, holding that Robertson had insufficient evidence of her husband’s consent to the posthumous use of his sperm.

Click here to read the full court opinion.


CW3 Founder Robert L. Schein’s Interview with Valerie

COVID-19 placed unexpected challenges to Estate Planning; as well as, increased focus on its importance. In this interview, Valerie discusses with CW3 Founder, Robert L. Schein, how she has continued to make sure her clients’ needs are being met throughout this pandemic; and, answers questions about Estate Planning, Trusts, and Wills for anyone considering or in the process of estate planning. Click here to view the full interview.


Upcoming Events

Legal Land Mines in the Time of the Pandemic

Join us for Part II of our COVID-19 Webinar Series with Palm Springs Life.

July 8, 2020 11:00 AM – 12:30 PM

In Part II of our series with Palm Springs Life, SBEMP Partners Valerie Powers Smith and Vee B. Sotelo review current employers’ law suits, employees’ rights under the CARES Act, and novel legal theories that will set precedent for employers in the future.

RSVP Here


 

DISCLAIMER: This newsletter does not constitute legal advice, and no attorney-client relationship is formed by reading it. This newsletter may be considered ATTORNEY ADVERTISING in some states. Prior results do not guarantee a similar outcome. Additional facts or future developments may affect subjects contained within this newsletter. Before acting or relying upon any information within this newsletter, seek the advice of an attorney.

SBEMP Webinar: Legal Land Mines in the Time of the Pandemic

In Part II of our SBEMP legal series learn about current employer law suits, employees’ rights under the CARES act, and novel legal theories that will set precedent for employers for years to come.

Aired Wednesday, July 8, 2020 11:00 AM – 12:30 PM

Legal Land Mines in the Time of the Pandemic…what’s legal? what’s not?

Family Law Experts

Family Law

Divorce and other family law issues can be complex, and the best way to ensure that your rights are fully protected is to have an experienced law firm by your side with expertise in family law. If you are planning to file for divorce or going through the divorce process already, make sure you obtain the best possible legal advice on all aspects related to your case. 

Attorneys at SBEMP (Slovak, Baron, Empey, Murphy & Pinkney) law firm provide professional legal advice and services to clients in Palm Springs, Palm Desert, Rancho Mirage, Inland Empire, Orange County, Coachella Valley, Costa Mesa, San Diego, New Jersey, New York, and surrounding locations. 

 

Expertise of SBEMP Attorneys in Family Law 

SBEMP’s family law attorneys are committed to assisting you through all legal issues related to your divorce or separation, including property division, child custody, and spousal and child support.

Even if you are planning to make a prenup or post-nup agreement with your spouse, SBEMP will guide you and help you negotiate and draft the agreement in the most effective manner. 

The legal team at SBEMP will put maximum resources and skills on your case to help you achieve the most satisfactory and expeditious result through negotiations, and where necessary, in court. The law firm is equally equipped to support you if you choose the mediation process to resolve your family law issues.

 

Areas of Expertise 

  • Prenuptial, postnuptial, and separation agreements
  • Divorce proceedings, including high-net-worth, high-profile/celebrity, and high-conflict matters
  • Child support and spousal maintenance
  • Custody and access rights
  • Valuation and distribution of property
  • Marvin actions
  • Domestic partnerships
  • Domestic violence and restraining orders
  • Mediation
  • Enforcement proceedings
  • Mediation and collaborative divorce
  • All aspects of Paternity matters
  • Adoptions
  • Post Judgment enforcement issues

Where required, your SBEMP family law attorneys will work with forensic accountants, business appraisers, forensic psychologists and other experts in order to strengthen your high conflict custody or high net worth divorce case. 

As the firm specializes in multiple practice areas, you will have the advantage to obtain expert advice from the firm’s attorneys specializing in corporate, trusts and estates, real estate, and other areas to achieve the best financial outcomes. 

 

Two Crucial Aspects to Look for in a Family Law Attorney

Experience 

The first thing you should focus on is whether the law firm you are hiring has the necessary experience in family law and whether its attorneys have handled similar family law issues in the past. Most family law issues are governed by state statutes, and the law firm should have deep domain knowledge of the state laws related to your divorce case. 

 

Resources

Many attorneys have very limited resources, and operate with a skeletal staff, equipment and technology. These limitations can create challenges when your divorce or family law matter is at a crucial stage. You need to work with family law attorneys that have the backing and resources of a full-fledged law firm and have an in-house network of legal experts to support your case. 

Lawyers at the SBEMP law firm serve clients from Palm Springs, Palm Desert, Rancho Mirage, Inland Empire, Orange County, Coachella Valley, Costa Mesa, San Diego, New Jersey, New York, and nearby locations for a range of legal practice areas.

https://sbemp.com/carolyn-h-martino/Contact SBEMP Law Firm if You Have a Legal Question

For more information or to request a consultation please contact the law offices of SBEMP (Slovak, Baron, Empey, Murphy & Pinkney) by clicking here. 

SBEMP LLP is a full service law firm with attorney offices in Palm Springs (Palm Desert, Inland Empire, Rancho Mirage), CA; Indian Wells, CA; Costa Mesa (Orange County), CA; San Diego, CA; New Jersey, NJ; and New York, NY.

DISCLAIMER: This blog post does not constitute legal advice, and no attorney-client relationship is formed by reading it. This blog post may be considered ATTORNEY ADVERTISING in some states. Prior results do not guarantee a similar outcome. Additional facts or future developments may affect subjects contained within this blog post. Before acting or relying upon any information within this newsletter, seek the advice of an attorney.

Emancipation Law

What Is Emancipation?

Emancipation ends the legal authority that a parent has over a child who is under 18. After emancipation, your parent doesn’t have to take care of you or pay for things that you need. Emancipation changes your life. You will have some new rights and also some new responsibilities.

When Can You Get a Judge to Emancipate You?

You have to be at least 14 and living away from home. Your parents have to agree with your decision. They could also decide not to fight you in court. You have to have a legal income that pays for food, clothes, and rent. The judge has to decide that emancipation is best for you.

How do I get emancipated?

There are three ways a child can become emancipated:

  • Get married
  • Join the military
  • Go to court and have the judge declare you emancipated (“judicial declaration”).

Do I need my parents’ consent (permission) to get emancipated?

If you ask a judge to declare you emancipated, you must give notice to your parents. Your parents can consent to the emancipation or they can go to court to contest the emancipation.

If you are not emancipated, you need your parents’ consent to join the military. If you are not emancipated and you want to get married, you need your parents’ consent and a judge’s consent.

Can any child get a judge to declare him/her emancipated?

No. There are certain requirements:

  • You must be 14 years old, or older.
  • You must be willing to live apart from your parents with their consent
  • You must be managing your own financial affairs.
  • Your income must be from a legal source.
  • Emancipation must be in your best interests.
  • You should be in school. (The emancipation law does not require that you be in school, but compulsory education laws do. The judge usually wants to see that you are either in school, have already graduated, or have earned a GED).

What rights do I get if I become emancipated?

If you are emancipated, you can:

  • Live where you want to.
  • Sign contracts.
  • Keep the money you earn.
  • Buy, sell, lease, or give away any interest you have in real or personal property.
  • Get a work permit without parental consent.
  • Enroll yourself in school.
  • Sue someone in your own name.
  • Make a valid Will.
  • Consent to your own medical, dental, and psychiatric care.
  • Stay out as late as you want. (Curfew laws do not apply to emancipated minors.)

What responsibilities will I have if I get emancipated?

If you are emancipated, you must:

  • Support yourself financially.
  • Get your own medical, dental, and automobile insurance.
  • Pay your bills.
  • Make sure your income is from a legal source.

What things won’t change when I get emancipated?

Even after you are emancipated:

  • You must go to school until you graduate or turn 18.
  • You cannot work as many hours as you want. You must still obey child labor laws and follow work permit rules.
  • You can’t have sex unless you are married and have sex with your spouse.
  • You may be tried as an adult if you commit a crime. A judge will decide if you will be tried in Juvenile Court or tried as an adult. Whether or not you are emancipated has no bearing on being tried as an adult.
  • You cannot drink alcohol until you turn 21.
  • You cannot vote until you are 18.

How can I get help to get emancipated?

Emancipation is a big decision. Take time to think about it and plan it carefully. If you want to talk about your options, then contact us today.

Have any legal questions? Contact SBEMP Law Firm: 

For more information or to request a consultation please contact the law offices of SBEMP (Slovak, Baron, Empey, Murphy & Pinkney) by clicking here. 

SBEMP LLP is a full service law firm with attorney offices in Palm Springs (Palm Desert, Inland Empire, Rancho Mirage, Indian Wells), CA; Indian Wells, CA; Costa Mesa (Orange County), CA; San Diego, CA; New Jersey, NJ; and New York, NY.

DISCLAIMER: This blog post does not constitute legal advice, and no attorney-client relationship is formed by reading it. This blog post may be considered ATTORNEY ADVERTISING in some states. Prior results do not guarantee a similar outcome. Additional facts or future developments may affect subjects contained within this blog post. Before acting or relying upon any information within this newsletter, seek the advice of an attorney.

Paycheck Protection Program Flexibility Act

On Friday, June 5, 2020, the President signed the Paycheck Protection Program Flexibility Act (PPPFA) into law. This Act modifies the CARES Act and allows more loan forgiveness for Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loans. PPP loans are now operating under new regulations and deadlines. Business owners currently working under PPP funds should be aware of these recent changes and adjust their plans accordingly. The approved amendments for the PPP are as follows:

  • Current PPP borrowers can choose to extend the eight-week period to 24 weeks, or they can keep the original eight-week period. New PPP borrowers will have a 24-week covered period, but the covered period may not extend beyond Dec. 31, 2020. This flexibility is designed to make it easier for more borrowers to reach full, or almost full, forgiveness.
  • Under the language in the House bill, the payroll expenditure requirement drops to 60% from 75% but is now a cliff, meaning that borrowers must spend at least 60% on payroll or none of the loan will be forgiven. Currently, a borrower is required to reduce the amount eligible for forgiveness if less than 75% of eligible funds are used for payroll costs, but forgiveness is not eliminated if the 75% threshold is not met.  Rep. Chip Roy (Texas), who co-sponsored the bill in the House, said in a House speech that the bill intended the sliding scale to remain in effect at 60%. Senators Marco Rubio and Susan Collins indicated that technical tweaks could be made to the bill to restore the sliding scale.
  • Borrowers can use the 24-week period to restore their workforce levels and wages to the pre-pandemic levels required for full forgiveness. This must be done by Dec. 31, a change from the previous deadline of June 30.
  • The legislation includes two new exceptions allowing borrowers to achieve full PPP loan forgiveness even if they do not fully restore their workforce. Previous guidance already allowed borrowers to exclude from those calculations employees who turned down good faith offers to be rehired at the same hours and wages as before the pandemic. The new bill allows borrowers to adjust because they could not find qualified employees or were unable to restore business operations to Feb. 15, 2020, levels due to COVID-19 related operating restrictions.
  • New borrowers now have five years to repay the loan instead of two. Existing PPP loans can be extended up to 5 years if the lender and borrower agree. The interest rate remains at 1%.
  • The bill allows businesses that took a PPP loan to also delay payment of their payroll taxes, which was prohibited under the CARES Act.

The PPPFA is designed to help small businesses work effectively with PPP loans, and to have more time to adjust with economic changes. To read the full act, please click here.

Child Custody Law

Child custody is often the foremost concern of divorcing couples who have minor children. It is also one of the most emotionally challenging aspects of a divorce. Child custody laws are determined by state statute, and it is important to under the laws in your state if child custody is expected to be one of the deciding factors in your divorce. 

Attorneys at SBEMP (Slovak, Baron, Empey, Murphy & Pinkney) law firm provide professional legal advice and services to clients in Palm Springs, Palm Desert, Rancho Mirage, Inland Empire, Orange County, Coachella Valley, Costa Mesa, San Diego, New Jersey, New York, and surrounding communities. 

 

Types of Child Custody

Different types of child custody may be granted to divorcing parents by a family court. The court will make a decision after considering what would be in the child’s best interest. Individual preferences of a parent will be a secondary consideration, while the child’s best interest becomes the dominant factor. 

Family courts usually prefer that both parents should have an active involvement in the child’s life. However, in exceptional situations, the court may grant sold custody of the child to one parent. Here are some of the important types of child custody: 

 

Physical Custody 

This refers to the decision regarding which parent should be in physical possession of the child. Unless the court has strong reasons to believe that the child’s best interests will be served when only one parent is granted sole physical custody, this award is rarely given. 

 

Legal Custody 

Legal custody allows a parent to make key life decisions on the child’s behalf, even if the actual physical custody lies with the other parent. If the parent is unable make these decisions or is absent, they will not be awarded legal custody in most situations. 

 

Joint Custody 

It is the most common form of child custody in all the states. In this case, the child gets an opportunity to closely engage with both parents separately. 

 

Split Custody

In exceptional circumstances, the children may be divided between the parents. The court usually would like to keep the siblings together, but in very rare cases, split custody may be granted. 

 

Factors Court will Consider for Custody 

Sometimes it may not be simple for the court to determine what is in the best interest of the child. In these situations, a social worker or psychologist may be enlisted to evaluate the child so that the court can make an informed decision. In general, the court will consider the following factors while determining custody: 

  • Personal preference of the child (child above a certain age)
  • Parents’ physical and mental health condition 
  • Whether one of the parents has a confirmed problem of substance abuse 
  • How well a parent has adjusted into the community 
  • Whether the parent is in a position to provide a stable and secure upbringing to the child 
  • Whether the child will be able to interact with other family members and relatives
  • Cultural and religious considerations

Lawyers at the SBEMP law firm serve clients from Palm Springs, Palm Desert, Rancho Mirage, Inland Empire, Orange County, Coachella Valley, Costa Mesa, San Diego, New Jersey, New York, and nearby locations for a range of legal practice areas.


Contact Us

For more information or to request a consultation please contact the law offices of SBEMP (Slovak, Baron, Empey, Murphy & Pinkney) by clicking here. 

SBEMP LLP is a full service law firm with attorney offices in Palm Springs (Palm Desert, Inland Empire, Rancho Mirage), CA; Indian Wells, CA; Costa Mesa (Orange County), CA; San Diego, CA; New Jersey, NJ; and New York, NY.

DISCLAIMER: This blog post does not constitute legal advice, and no attorney-client relationship is formed by reading it. This blog post may be considered ATTORNEY ADVERTISING in some states. Prior results do not guarantee a similar outcome. Additional facts or future developments may affect subjects contained within this blog post. Before acting or relying upon any information within this newsletter, seek the advice of an attorney.

SBEMP Legal Experts Outline Your COVID-19 Response at Work, Home | PALM SPRINGS LIFE

SBEMP legal experts tell a Palm Springs Life webinar audience how employers should safely return employees to work, and individuals can plan for a potential health emergency.

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Palm Springs
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Orange County
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Palm Springs California Law Firm