Understanding ‘Fee to Trust’ Agreements Under Palm Springs Tribal Law

The Native American people under Palm Springs tribal law need to understand the legal ramifications of holding land in trust and the possibilities of earning a fee in trust.

Trust Lands

According to the U.S. Department of the Interior, Indian Affairs, tribal authority over land is mostly achieved by having “trust” lands. This legal designation is made by the United States Bureau of the Interior as follows under the principles set up by the U.S. Congress in the Indian Reorganization Act, which received reaffirmation by Congress under the Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act.

The Congress of the United States attempts to follow policies under these laws that were first established more than 80 years ago. Many federal programs are only available for those on reservations and those who hold trust lands.

In some parts of the United States, the trust lands are very valuable. The development of these properties is a source of great revenue for the Native American people that have the ownership of these trust lands. Additionally, in some circumstances, new trust land may be acquired by certain tribes.

Acquiring Trust Lands

For Native American tribes, acquiring trust land may allow many opportunities, such as enhanced housing development, energy use and development, and generate revenues from the rights-of-way uses and leases that are possible for such lands held in trust.

Any process regarding trust lands and receiving a fee in trust is a complex legal endeavor. Holding land in trust enables Native American tribes to also protect areas for hunting and agriculture that are strong components of tribal culture.

For these reasons, is it very important to consult with one of our qualified attorneys to get proper guidance about how to proceed with issues involving trust land and how to establish a fee in trust agreement.